British coins sell well at Spink

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04 April 2020
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Spink's 'behind closed doors' sale saw 97% of the lots sell for over the pre-sale estimate, proving that the world of coin collecting is still very active despite the difficulties of Covid-19.

The British Coins and Commemorative Medals: Spring Auction was held behind closed doors due to the global lockdown, but there was still a great interest from online bidders, meaning almost very lots found a new home. The highlights included a Charles I Triple-Unite of 1643 and a .

Charles I (1625-49), Triple-Unite, 1643. SOLD FOR £65,000
Minted in Oxford during the English Civil War, the rare variety features a 'more artistic portrait' than other designs, according to coin author and expert Beresford-Jones writing in the 1950s. The coin features the Oxford plume on the obverse only.

George IV (1820-30), Proof Five-Pounds, 1826. SOLD FOR £55,000
The description of the milled coin stated: "bare head left, rev. crowned shield in mantle, • decus et tutamen • anno regni septimo • [downwards] on edge (W&R 213 [R3]; S.3797), some fingermarks before head and other light handling marks across brilliant surfaces, otherwise a pleasing extremely fine, rare."

Early Anglo-Saxon England pale gold Shilling pendant. SOLD FOR £10,000
 In the style of a 4th-century Solidus, the 3.16g coin features a diademed, draped and cuirassed bust, facing right, and on the reverse a cross on four steps. The coin was said to be: "extremely rare and of numismatic importance, five examples are known, this being only the second thought available to commerce."

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Anglo-Frisian gold Solidus. SOLD FOR £10,000
In the style of Louis the Pious (c. 814-840), the gold Solidus was dated c. 816-818 was described as being "an endearingly crude imitation of good fabric, a rare example of ninth century gold coinage closely associated with the fledgling 'English' economy, good very fine, albeit much as struck, and of numismatic importance."


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Images courtesy of Spink. Visit the website at: spink.com